Will the west rule?

As the world recovers from the recession, the economy is slowly starting to stabilize shifting from the U.S. to the BRICS as these countries have shown tremendous growth compared to the OECD countries. From 1987 to 2009, the average growth rate was 2.7 per cent, while China’s growth was 9.5 per cent. Realignment has been realized in factors such as, GDP and wealth, escalades of trade disputes, deepening of third world debt, growing power of multinational corporations, increasing competitiveness and its impact on foreign direct investment. While China still faces challenges such as distribution of wealth, predictions for 2020 are that China will account for 25 per cent of the global GDP growth. Trade in major economies has experienced ‘n ripple effect in recent years, but still showing healthy growth due to globalization, liberization of markets.

The world’s most developed economies still show dominance of the global competitive indexes, which indicates that these countries still provide a higher level income to their citizens. BRICS are accounting for the top investment destinations across the world, joining the major economies. While countries such as the U.S. and Germany show steady growth, these countries are ones to invest for major growth. But there are still big challenges which have to be addressed to stay upon the path of growth. These challenges include improvement of health, education and infrastructure. In most developed economies most of the population has secondary education, which allows these economies to move toward the next step of policy towards growth. An improvement in infrastructure, allows efficient flow of trade channels and development. There are additional factors which should be addressed such as population growth, but the basics still remain the key blocks to building success in modern economics.

GDP and shifting wealthGDP and shifting wealth;

  • escalation of trade disputes;
  • deepening of third world debt;
  • battles among economic models and the role of government in economic development;
  • growing power and influence of multinational corporations; and
  • increasing competitiveness and its impact on direct foreign investment.

GDP and shifting wealth;

  • escalation of trade disputes;
  • deepening of third world debt;
  • battles among economic models and the role of government in economic development;
  • growing power and influence of multinational corporations; and
  • increasing competitiveness and its impact on direct foreign investment.

GDP and shifting wealth;

  • escalation of trade disputes;
  • deepening of third world debt;
  • battles among economic models and the role of government in economic development;
  • growing power and influence of multinational corporations; and
  • increasing competitiveness and its impact on direct foreign investment.

GDP and shifting wealth;

  • escalation of trade disputes;
  • deepening of third world debt;
  • battles among economic models and the role of government in economic development;
  • growing power and influence of multinational corporations; and
  • increasing competitiveness and its impact on direct foreign investment.

GDP and shifting wealth;

  • escalation of trade disputes;
  • deepening of third world debt;
  • battles among economic models and the role of government in economic development;
  • growing power and influence of multinational corporations; and
  • increasing competitiveness and its impact on direct foreign investment.

 

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One comment

  1. You start off making some good points but lose the plot towards the end. I think that looking at the drivers of growth is an interesting way to view the future growth of the developed and emerging economies, but there you have to provide more evidence – say how much they are investing etc. It is not clear what the bulleted list is about. It seems different from the point that you are making up to there. The fact that the list is repeated a few times has to do with pasting from Word. It is best to clear all formatting before pasting to WordPress.

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